Customer satisfaction dropped in 2017. Is your team doing its best to improve it?


When a customer requests information from a company to decide whether to acquire one of its products, or when he needs a problem with one of its services to be solved urgently, the company needs to provide help quickly and efficiently. Therefore, it is vital that its customer service team be prepared to provide an adequate response, and in the shortest time possible.

In order to improve customer satisfaction, it is also essential to constantly monitor the team’s work. But, are customers satisfied with the service that companies are providing? What can be done to improve that satisfaction?

There is still room for improvement in customer satisfaction

The company LiveChat recently published a report on Customer Service containing some interesting information about degrees of satisfaction in 2017. To do this they collected data provided by 21,000 companies in 22 industries, using different support tickets and live chats, along with some of their sales and customer service tools. To be exact, they analysed 334 million chats and 17 million tickets.

The main conclusion of this report was that, in general, customers are satisfied: on average, customer satisfaction was 83.54%. Although this data is positive, there is still room for improvement. And, unfortunately, it was down off the previous year: in 2016, customer satisfaction was at 86.35%.

The report also indicates that, when it comes to meeting customers’ online requests, not all companies are equally effective. Of those analysed, technological companies were those satisfying customers most: the level at software companies was 90.6%; web hosting, 89.6%; and at IT, 86.8%.

Companies’ size also impacts the service they provide their customers: small (one to nine employees) and medium-sized (between 10 and 49) companies had the lowest customer satisfaction rate, at 81%, which shows that they still have to improve their service.

Another report produced by the company Superoffice, specialising in CRM products, reached even more pessimistic conclusions. The company sent two questions to 1,000 companies, asking them for their telephone numbers and the location of price information on their website.

Surprisingly, 62% of companies did not even respond to the email sent to customer service. In addition, 90% did not let the user know that their email had been sent successfully, through a confirmation message. As for the average response time amongst the companies that answered, it was 12 hours and 10 minutes. The fastest answer was in one minute, and the slowest took 8 days. Thus, as you have seen, customer service continues to be unfinished business for many companies.


Are you taking the optimal measures to satisfy your customers?

As we have said, there is still room for improvement to make customer service more effective and, obviously, the response rate to emails should be 100%. If you lead a team charged with it, you have to ask yourself if the way you are organising it is ideal, and whether you monitor your team’s results and analyse its performance adequately.

For example, evaluating the average response time to a customer service email is a great help, as customers are more satisfied if they get a quick response. Customer service teams should dither about responding quickly or in the best possible way, as the important thing is for the first response to the customer to arrive in just a few seconds, and for the team to, later, have the necessary tools to solve the customer’s problem or answer his question in the shortest time possible.

That is, it is not necessary to fulfil all his requests in one’s first email, but rather to interact with the customer as quickly as possible, to start the conversation with him.

Knowing the number of customer service emails that arrive, either through support tickets or other channels, can also be very beneficial. By analysing email volume and response times you will be able to know whether your team is able to satisfy all customers quickly, or whether, on the contrary, it is necessary to hire more staff, or change your strategy to meet demand.

Awareness of the best time to contact customers (according to our data, morning is best) can also make communication with them more successful, especially when acting proactively. It is also a good idea to establish a criterion to ask your customers themselves about their degree of satisfaction.

To be able to monitor all this data, Gmail Meter can be very useful. Thanks to its detailed analytics on the team’s inboxes, it is possible to measure their performance and act to improve the customer’s experience, to strive for a 100% satisfaction rate.

You can improve customer satisfaction by monitoring the average response time of your team’s inboxes. Try

Is customer success the same as customer support?


Maintaining smooth communications with customers, guiding them at all times, and helping them make the most of a company’s product are some of the tasks that all businesses must perform in order to satisfy their users.

Customer success and customer support teams are charged with this mission. However, although these two concepts are often used interchangeably, the truth is that there are notable differences between them. In fact, the objectives of these departments, the way they work, and the metrics to evaluate their performance, are different. Here we discuss the different functions they perform.

Differences between customer success and customer support

In essence, we can define customer success as a business focus on using technology and users’ information to ensure that they continuously receive value from a product throughout their life cycle as customers.

Thus, customer success is a philosophy based on forging closer ties with users and interacting with them proactively so that their experience a the product and brand are as positive as possible. In short, pleasing customers is a good way to retain them, which has a positive impact on a company’s revenues.

Customer support, meanwhile, is geared towards satisfying the user when he has a problem. Thus, this team tries to remove all the obstacles that a customer might encounter, and provides him with the assistance he needs to enjoy the product or service he wants.

These are the main differences:

  • Being proactive vs. reacting. A customer success team must take the initiative, while customer support is based on a reaction to the customer’s needs: when a user requests help via any channel (email, telephone, social networks), he needs to be given an effective solution soon as possible.
  • A continuous mission vs. a specific task. Customer success is not a task to be carried out in a fixed period, as the relationship with the customer is an on-going one. Customer support, on the other hand, is provided in a series of isolated cases, each with a beginning and an end. They start with a customer’s request and end when his issue is resolved. While the former centres on the long term, the latter concentrates on the short term.
  • Impact on business vs. immediate effectiveness. The metrics that evaluate customer success are much more generic than customer support ones, as in the first case an attempt is made to measure the impact on the business in the long term, whereas with customer support quality and speed of response are evaluated.


Metrics to evaluate customer support and customer success

As stated, the metrics to evaluate the results of each team are different. Customer success teams do not solve specific problems, but rather try to improve the consumer’s long-term experience. Therefore, the Repeat Rate (evaluating how many customers purchase again), CLV (Customer Lifetime Value, gauging the margin obtained over time with a customer) and Customer Retention Rate (the ability to keep customers; that is, the recurrence of purchases) are some of the metrics to measure this department’s results.

Customer support metrics are more specific, and can be evaluated after each interaction. The CSAT, or Customer Satisfaction Score, measures reactions to the service received; the Customer Effort Score (CES) evaluates the effort the user had to make to get his problem solved, and the Net Promotion Score (NPS) indicates whether the customer would recommend a product or service to those in his social circle.  


How do I create each team?

Many companies have a customer support team, but they are less likely to have one dedicated to customer success. After all, Customer Support is a marketing field that has been studied for far longer, while the customer success approach is more recent and less defined.

In one way or another, the truth is that any company, in accordance with its size, should have a customer support team, and another customer success one, or professionals focusing on these differentiated approaches, with distinct functions and objectives. This does not mean that the two should not relate to each other. In fact, they should definitely communicate with each other to improve the customer’s overall experience.

These two teams interact with customers all the time, so they will both receive comments about failures and problems, but also advantages, detected by customers, which they should be aware of. A company will operate better if these areas work in a coordinated way, as customer support’s short-term work is complemented by customer success’s long-term vision.

Therefore, creating these teams, training their professionals, assigning them different responsibilities, and evaluating their performance with the help of metrics, is essential. Gmail Meter can be very useful in this regard.

Want to see how we help Customer Succes and Customer Support managers to get inbox stats and manage email success / support teams? Try

Is internal competition an email sales driver?


Setting a goal to meet, getting motivated to achieve it, and striving as hard as possible to overcome the challenges along the way are some of the keys to success in different areas of life, work among them. When it comes to leading a team of workers, a manager not only has to follow this process at an individual level, but he is also in charge of conveying to others the objectives that must be achieved and the motivation necessary to make an effort.

In this regard, if you are at the helm of a sales team, you may wonder whether it is better to promote internal competitiveness on the team to motivate its members to try new sales tactics, or whether, on the contrary, competitiveness can be negative and end up generating discomfort and distrust.

There is no doubt that when you want to win a race, seeing the finish line and knowing that behind you there are other athletes running towards it too can spur your to pick up the pace. Similarly, in a sales department, promoting competition can encourage employees to achieve better results.

However, the strategy to promote rivalry must be well defined, to avoid creating an awkward work environment. Don’t make workers try to improve at the cost of harming others. Rather, encourage them to follow their peers’ example.

Rivalry is all right, as long as it is healthy

Healthy competition can yield good results, both individually and for teams as whole units. But, how can you promote it? These are some guidelines.

  • Be clear about the metrics you want to study.  Logically, in a football game, for example, the most important thing is to know the other team. But that’s not all. Measuring ball possession and shots on goal is also important. Similarly, in a sales department there are a few metrics that should be considered beyond total sales: sales by product or service, by the channel one has used to achieved the lead, sales to recurring customers, or to new customers, etc.

Obviously, comparing the results of each team member (individual sales, number of calls or number of customers contacted that resulted in sales) can also be of great help. 

  • Set the competition’s objectives. Logically, it is useless to measure the team without communicating the objectives that are to be achieved. However, it is not enough to set a quarterly sales target, or one for a specific campaign. You also have to teach the team how they can achieve that goal. For example, by following these guidelines you can teach them to write better emails.

It is also important that you explain not only what they need to do, but also why. This is the only way to ensure that competitiveness is beneficial for all the team members and does not negatively affect their motivation, or damage their self-esteem. Explaining to them in detail how meeting those goals will benefit them individually, and how it will also help to achieve the department and company’s mission, will strengthen their commitment.


  • Make the winners public (and reward them).  Logically, as in any contest, it is important to recognise the winners and reward them adequately. Set aside any inadequate and obsolete strategies that involve rebuking instead of rewarding: a good sales manager does not publicly humiliate the loser, but rather encourages everyone to excel.

The best managers should not focus on negative results, but rather praise positive ones.  Public recognition, economic rewards and more original prizes (a gift, an office party) are just some of the ways to acknowledge those workers who have posted the best results or showed the most commitment to a project, without neglecting to recognise other members of the team for their merits too.

In the day to day, the most common thing is to have a board, physical and virtual, featuring data charting each team member’s daily, monthly or quarterly progress, to motivate them to move up in the rankings.

Doing so benefits not only the one who gets the best results, but everyone else too: seeing that the rest can achieve sales goals will make them realise that it is possible to do so, and motivate them to identify how they can improve. Every month the counter returns to zero, so everyone has the chance to move up next time.

  • Motivate and strengthen ties. Just as coaches analyse results after a game, sales managers have to evaluate their teams’ performances, both individually and globally. But when he addresses the team face to face, he should never pit employees against each other, but rather encourage reflection. For example, he can have the best salespeople share useful tips for everyone, and encourage an exchange of opinions on areas for improvement.  


Digital tools, a tool to promote competition

Logically, to establish the parameters of the competition you must know that you will be able to measure all those results that enhanced competitiveness may increase. On the Web you can find a multitude of tools that help your company measure the performance of its sales team.

Stats showing a team’s email usage habits, at the individual and global level, are one of the metrics that help to improve performance in the healthy competitive environment that you have created.

Want to see how we help managers to get inbox stats and manage email sales teams? Try

Best practices for your email sales team


Every day dozens of emails from companies, relatives and acquaintances arrive in our inboxes, which barely gives us time to read them all. This is why the sending of emails by companies’ sales teams, a business process essential to attract customers, must be properly monitored and managed. There are also certain practices that can be followed to increase the likelihood that a client will read and respond to your messages.

If a sales team receives leads (records of people interested in your products, having sent their information via a form) and starts a conversation by email with those customers, if they have to answer a question from the potential customer, or need to send a personalised mail, there are a number of recommendations that you should keep in mind. Here we run down some good practices that a sales team should follow when using email:

How to write successful sales emails

Every word that you write in your email matters, from the Subject line to your closing. Now, what is the ideal wording for an email? These are some of the guidelines your sales team should follow when writing them:

  • The Subject line of the email is crucial. No matter how appealing your proposal is, the user will not read it if he never opens it. Thus, it is essential that the Subject be recognisable and interesting, as the objective is for the recipient to click on it. Similarly, taking great care with the first sentence of the email is important in terms of getting it opened, as it appears near the Subject line in the inbox.
  • Write short and simple emails. Although it may be tempting to offer lots of details, so that the client appreciates the work behind it, it is not a good idea to draft long emails. Quite the contrary. Follow the premise that less is more, and get to the point, keeping your email short. And the message has to be simple: if it is full of details the user will likely delete it instead of stopping to read it.
  • Ask just one question, or propose a single action in each email. If you ask too many questions, the client is unlikely to answer any of them. Remember that the key is for the message to be simple, so you have to ask a question that is also simple, so that recipients only have to spend a few minutes of their time responding to your query.
  • Your mail must have a purpose. Do not waste the time of a client or a future client with a follow-up email that does not have a clear objective. Your messages should always have a purpose, and it must be clear.

Ask your clients to respond. Often users decide to put of responding, and the email falls into oblivion. Therefore, you have to make them feel that, if they do not answer, you will no long offer them the opportunity in question. Do it politely, but let them know that their inaction will have consequences.desk-2852986_1280

How to write effective response emails

Responding to users who have shown interest in your product is essential to turn them into customers. To train sales professionals to respond effectively by email, follow these tips:

  • When you have to answer a lead, time is of the essence. As we already stated, every minute counts when it comes to email. The faster you answer a lead, the more likely you are to turn it into a sale. Quickly answering any questions is also vital.
  • Customise your answers. Avoid canned responses that lack personalisation as much as possible, but if you cannot avoid sending an automatic response, gather all the information you can from the email you receive, or include the name of the recipient, or your company, in the response. In fact, the experts stress that personalising your response will make them feel engaged in the proposal.
  • Always include a call to action. The purpose of the email should be clear in the body of the message, and should lead to a specific proposal at the end. So, as a close to the message, and before saying goodbye, include a call to action that instructs the user to take the next step.


How to manage sales emails

Following the above advice is useless if there is no proper management and follow-up of these messages. To manage your sales team’s emails, use technological tools:

  • Get your sales team’s email statistics. To determine whether your sales team’s emails are working, it is essential to have metrics. Using allows you to track your team’s habits when sending emails, the number of emails sent or received, the total number of senders, and response times, among many other data. Analysing them and making decisions based on them, you can boost your sales via email.
  • Use smart automation. Using pre-tested templates to draft messages, and automatic tools to personalise emails can be very helpful. Further, keeping in mind the best time of day and the best day of the week to send emails is also essential.
  • Try, try and try again. Monitoring the effectiveness of messages and acting accordingly is also essential. To do this, you can use the well-known A/B method: send two similar versions of the same email, but with some different elements, to different groups of users. Then analyse the results from each one to hone your future emails.

Would you like to manage your sales email teams? We can help out. Give a try to to measure your inbox performance or send us an email to We’d be happy to help.

Email stats as a team productivity metric


Today there are numerous corporate business processes that are carried out virtually. Whether because they are exclusively dedicated to making sales online, or because they have found in the Internet a complementary communication or sales channel for their physical business, companies today depend on the Web to reach their customers.

In fact, dozens of essential corporate tasks require the use of an online tool: email. Without going any further, email is one of the essential customer service channels, and also one of the essential marketing tools.

Email marketing is essential for the generation of leads and registered users; that is, people who supply their data via a website form and who are potentially interested in acquiring a product. In turn, email is also the perfect tool to transform those leads into customers, not to mention the importance of email as a communication tool with suppliers and workers.

This is why, whether you have your own company, run a business, or occupy a position of responsibility at any company, you will need to analyse how workers, and especially the sales team, use email, in order to improve their productivity. Response times to customer emails are one of those key kinds of data that, fortunately, you can now measure.

When it comes to email, every minute counts

Any sales or technical support team is aware that customers need to receive responses to their requests by email as soon as possible. A study published by USC (University of Southern California) analysing the emails of 2 million US users found that 90% of people who intend to answer an email do so within 2 days of receiving it. In fact, half of the answers take place within one hour. Age is also a factor: the older the recipients, the longer the response times.

Taking into account that we open a good portion of our virtual envelopes on the go, thanks to our smartphones, it seems logical that users are expecting replies faster. But how fast do they expect to be answered by a company?

According to one survey conducted by Toister Performance Solutions, 80% of customers are satisfied receiving an email in less than four hours, while 14% consider an answer in 15 minutes acceptable.

Many companies, however, do not meet these expectations. Another recent poll indicates that only 7% of them respond to emails within 5 minutes of receiving a request via the Web, 27% take 1 day, and 55% take five days or more. This is some alarming data, as a quick response may mean capturing a potential customer, or losing him.


A study by the Harvard Business Review based on data from more than 2,000 companies reached similar conclusions: 7% responded to leads in an hour; 16%, in more than an hour, but less than one day; 24% took more than one day, and 23% did not even respond.

Analysing 1.25 million leads collected by dozens of US companies, they found that companies contacting their potential customers an hour after receiving a query were 7 times more likely to convert a lead into a sale than those that did so after one hour – and they were 60 times more likely than those that took a whole day.

Other studies confirm the importance of contacting customers within five minutes after receiving a request: the longer a company takes, the less likely it is to succeed. Thus, the time factor is fundamental with inbound marketing strategies. Once one has attracted a user and the lead has been generated, it is crucial to communicate with him quickly to turn him into a customer.

When responding, other important factors come into play to attract customers via email. As we discussed recently, it is important to consider what day of the week and what time of day are ideal for recipients to read our communications.

The email metrics that you can already check

Therefore, if you are at the helm of a company, you will be interested in analysing the average response times to your customers. The new premium version of Gmail Meter allows company or team leaders to easily measure the speed of corporate responses through email, among other data. This is definitely of great benefit to managers and executives, as metrics are key to management. You can’t manage what you don’t measure.

These are some of the email stats that you can obtain by running an analysis of your workers’ inboxes using Gmail Meter:

  • Response times to emails.
  • Fastest response time.
  • Messages sent at a given time of day or a given day of the week.
  • Recipients interacted with most.
  • Total number of emails sent and received.

Do you want to see a demo of Gmail Meter Premium? Write us an email at and we will answer you as quickly as you deserve.

Ten really useful apps that your company should use in 2018


Email is, without a doubt, the primary communication tool in the corporate world. However, there are other platforms that can help improve employee productivity, facilitate work on a day-to-day basis, and bolster connections with customers. To help you discover the most useful, we have come up with our 10 favourite apps for companies, so that yours can start out the year enjoying their advantages.


Bots, smart programs that make it possible to meet the needs of users automatically, are one of the biggest corporate trends for 2018. Manychat is a tool that helps to create them easily in Facebook Messenger, in order to improve marketing and customer service.

With this platform one can create a personalised bot to assist customers, inform him when a human response is required, send scheduled messages, and monitor all interactions in the blue chat, which already has 1.3 billion users.


LinkedIn Lead Gen Forms

In addition to a social network to gather professional contacts, LinkedIn can also be a marketing tool for companies. The Microsoft-owned platform has launched LinkedIn Lead Gen Forms, a service that facilitates the generation of leads through forms.

When a user clicks on an ad, the platform offers him a simple form. The company that has launched the advertising then receives all the data on his profile, and can redirect him to its website, thus obtaining valuable information to better know its potential customers.


Writing a document in Word and sending it by email to receive feedback from colleagues can be a waste of time. Quip is a web platform and an app for smartphones that simplifies the process considerably.

From the same panel one can work collaboratively on different documents, whether they are texts or spread sheets, mention other team members, make a list of tasks, and comment on the content through a chat, without leaving the group.


Obviously, launching an email marketing campaign requires strong previous organization and an analysis of the results. Mailshake lends the company a hand with these tasks. Only a Google account is needed to plan and automate the sending of emails to customers, thanks to a calendar.

In addition, it allows one to study what the results have been: how many users have opened the email, how many have clicked on the link, and which have requested more information.



The popularity of Instagram, which already boasts 800 million monthly active users, demonstrates the importance we assign photographs and videos. Then why not apply moving images to business communication?

Bonjoro aims for us to reach out to our clients through more than written messages, as the app is designed to send corporate videos to clients’ inboxes. In this way the company is able to welcome them and explain its service to them by creating a more personal link.

Facebook for Companies

With more than 2 billion users per month, Facebook is, by far, the premier social network. That is why every company’s digital strategy must aim to succeed on it.

With Facebook for Companies you will be able to create a corporate page through which to communicate with customers and promote it, take advantage of information from the social network to segment your campaigns; place ads on Facebook, Instagram, Messenger and other sites on the Net through Audience Network; and optimise campaigns, thanks to its measurement features and a long list of others.



Every company needs to manage and organize large amounts of information. The Airtable platform allows them to work with databases without having advanced knowledge, adapting interfaces to their needs, whether working with a spread sheet, gallery or calendar.

Multiple members of the same team can also edit data in real time from their mobiles, thereby improving project management.


Kajabi can be useful for those professionals who want to combine work with education, or companies that want, in addition to offering a product, to open a new business line, sharing their workersknowledge.

This platform allows you to upload educational videos online, make them viewable for a certain fee, and perform the marketing actions necessary for them to succeed.


This software helps both Human Resources managers and the rest of a company’s team: each employee has a profile with all the details on his career, job, and even tastes, accessible depending on permits.

The employees can use BambooHR to request vacation time, while managers can use it to draft follow-up reports or set goals. In addition, it makes it possible to filter the data in different ways to draw conclusions, for example, from a company’s rotation figures.



Every corporate website needs a form to facilitate contact with its customers and suppliers. But very few are aesthetic and user-friendly.

Not so with the Typeform: this app offers forms adapted to all types of devices, that are interactive (the questions that appear depend on the previous answer), with a variety of different designs, depending on the company, and different graphic features.  In addition to all these advantages, creating forms is very simple.


“We haven’t include Gmail Meter in the list above, but we feel confident you’d love to use it if you need to know how you and your team manage email. Check it out and give us a try.

An inbox in your pocket: how we check our email on our smartphones


In your pocket, on your desk or even on your night stand: in recent years the smartphone has become an inseparable companion. In fact, many of the tools that we used to use on our computers are now found on these devices, which can be taken anywhere.

One of them is email. More and more users open emails, whether personal or corporate, using their smartphones and tablets. That is why Marketing specialists and customer service experts cannot ignore small screens, and have to take them into account when designing their campaigns. But, to what extent do we use our smartphones to check email? We provide you with some figures revealing the rise of mobile mail.

The ascendancy of small screens

A few months ago Gmail surpassed 1 billion active users. Outlook, meanwhile, has more than 400 million active monthly users. In all, according to a recent study by The Radicati Group, there will be more than 3.7 billion email users in the world by the end of 2017.

Mobile phone users are even more numerous: a GSMA Intelligence study states that there are already more than 5 billion people with a mobile phone in the world, accounting for more than two thirds of the total population. According to a study by eMarketer, there are already 2.4 billion smartphone users.

The figures reflect the importance of electronic mail as a communication tool, and smartphones as a device. Now, do we open many emails from our mobiles?

According to the latest email marketing study conducted by IBM, based on messages sent by 750 companies in 40 countries, almost half (49%) of the emails were read on a mobile device, 22% on a computer, and 29% through a webmail service. Among all the countries analysed, the high penetration of mobile mail in the United Kingdom stands out: 55% of emails are read on smartphones there, while in the rest of Europe that percentage is 32%, and, in the United States, 49%. est_2

Adobe recently published a study that reached similar conclusions. After interviewing 1,000 white-collar workers in the United States, the study highlighted that the smartphone is the device most used to check email regularly: 81% use their smartphones to access their virtual mailboxes, 74% use their desktop computer or laptops, 21% use their tablets, and only 2%, their smart watches.  

Unsurprisingly, the report shows that people want to be able to access their email from virtually anywhere (for example, 26% do so in bed), so the use of a mobile device becomes necessary.


The Adobe study points out that the device chosen to read emails depends on the purpose of the account. Although respondents prefer their smartphones if their mailboxes are personal (59% check this kind of account using their mobiles; 35%, from their computers; and 6%, from their tablets), they still prefer to check work email from a computer (62%, compared to 35% who do so with a smartphone, and 4% with a tablet).

A study conducted by the email marketing company Adestra also drew similar conclusions. In this case, they asked 1,200 personal email users of different generations whether they used a mobile device to check email before reading it on a computer. 40% of respondents between age 14 and 18 always check their accounts on a smartphone, a figure that drops to 29% amongst young people between 19 and 34, and to just 8% for users between 56 and 67.


Email, one of the most used apps

In addition to demonstrating that many users check their email with their smartphones, some analyses confirm that email is one of the most popular tools on smartphones.

A study conducted last year by Google based on the data of more than 11,000 of its users made it clear that the smartphone is the preferred device: on a normal day, more than a quarter of its users use only their smartphones to surf the Web, almost twice as many as those who use just a computer.  

Also, when we are actively using our phones, we interact with an average of 4.8 apps per hour. Instant messaging apps and search engines are the most used (83% use them), followed by social media (73%) and email apps (71%).

The future of email: increasingly mobile

Mobile devices allow us to open and respond to emails from anywhere. So, as you have seen, more and more are being used to check email. Although, logically, we continue to check it from our computers, marketing and customer service experts have to take into account in their campaigns that a good portion of the emails they send will be received on a device that fits in a pocket.

If you want to know about your habits when using Gmail, either from your computer or from your mobile phone, or you want detailed information on how your company’s employees use e-mail, Gmail Meter can help you. Get Gmail Meter, your Gmail statistics tool.

When is the best time to send an email to a customer?


Every time we click on “Send” to send an email to a client, we tend to ask ourselves the same questions: Is this the best time of the day to write him? What time would be best, for him to open and respond to the message? What times should I avoid so that it does not end up lost in a sea of messages in his inbox?

Obviously, the best time to send an email to a client, partner, supplier or co-worker is whenever he will see it on his computer. It is only logical that you are more likely to get a response from him if he is at his desk, rather than checking his email on his smartphone while traveling to the office, eating, or enjoying time off.

Now, the difficult thing is to ascertain when those minutes of the day are when the recipient is more likely to be sitting in front of his computer and paying attention to his email.

The users of Gmail Meter have detailed statistics about habits when managing corporate emails, thanks to our platform. Based on our data from more than 55,000 users, we’re going to tell you about the best time of day to send emails to partners, clients and other recipients in different cities.

Mornings: the best time

Before showing you the graphs that will illustrate the perfect time to send emails, we would like to stress that to produce them we have taken into account the different time zones of the different cities that we are going to cover, as well as the hours of the day when the most emails are sent by our users. This will allow us to deduce the best time to send one and receive an answer: if users send more messages at a certain time of day, that time will also be the best time for them to answer.

We begin by learning the habits of New Yorkers between January and October of this year. Based on the information on our users in the New York time zone, we can see how the number of emails sent peaked between 10 and 11 in the morning (specifically, 1,876 emails in the period from January to October). Therefore, that will be the best time to send an email to a person who lives in America’s Eastern Time Zone, including the citizens of the city that never sleeps.


We go west from New York to study habits in another American city: Chicago, in the state of Illinois. Based, again, on the total number of emails sent between January and October, we find that the best time to send them is also from 10 to 11 in the morning (more than 2,000 emails were sent during this time). We can infer, then, that the best time to send emails to any US location in the Central Time Zone is in the morning, but not first thing.


We now head to California to take a look at email habits in Los Angeles during the same period, the first ten months of the year. Despite the fact that its people send large numbers of emails in the morning, it is not until 1:00 to 2:00 pm that the numbers top out (2,249 during that hour). So now you know: if your recipient is on the West Coast, it is best to send your mail an hour or so after noon.


We now cross the Pacific and head for Tokyo. If you want to receive an answer from a client in the Japanese capital, corresponding with Japan Standard Time (JST), it is best to send it between 10 am and 12 noon in the morning. Gmail Meter users in Tokyo sent 1,265 emails every hour in the period analysed.


Fridays: the busiest day of the week

In all the cities analysed, a quick glance reveals that the first hours of the working day and the late hours of the afternoon are best to send emails.

Even if you do not know the exact time at which it is best to send them, the data probably did not surprise you too much. However, you may be surprised to know the day of the week when the most messages are sent. What day will be best to send emails to New Yorkers, Chicagoans, Los Angelites or Tokyo residents?

Here you can see the data on NY users. As is evident, their favourite day to send emails is Friday:


But New Yorkers are not the only ones who send a greater number of emails on the day that usually marks the end of the white-collar work week. The users of Gmail Meter in Chicago also opted to send more emails that day (as in the previous case, they sent more than 4,000).


On the West Coast they seem to have the same tastes as in the East. Friday is also the day preferred by users in Los Angeles to contact customers and partners by email:


Now, does the trend change in the country of the rising sun? It does not: Friday is also users’ favourite day to send emails in Tokyo. So, now you know. If you want to send emails to an important client, it is best to do so at the end of the week.

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The data shows that email is still alive and well (and is not going anywhere, for now)


Social media, corporate chats, instant messaging apps … in recent years the range of tools we use to communicate has expanded considerably. Despite this, one of them that came before remains essential: email.

Receiving and sending email continues to be a very common practice in our daily lives, both in the personal and in the corporate spheres. In fact, email is the predominant service for communication with suppliers, customers, and even between employees. According to a recent study by Adobe in the United States workers use email 5.4 hours a day.

An abundance of other data confirms that we continue to use email, even though new alternatives have appeared, and that we will continue to do so in the coming years. We take a look at the statistics, which show that email is more alive than ever:

More than 4 billion accounts in 2020

By the end of this year there will be more than 3.7 billion email users in the world. That is, practically half of the world’s population (now at more than 7.5 billion people) will communicate via this tool, according to the latest study by the California research firm The Radicati Group, which analyses email’s status annually.

The report, published at the beginning of the year, also indicates that the number of users has steadily increased in recent years: in 2009, the same firm indicated that there were 1.4 billion users, almost three times fewer.


The company also underscores that this growth will continue in the future: in 2021 there will be 4.1 billion users, which represents an annual increase of 3%. Logically, in the world there are more accounts than users, as it is common to have more than one (1.7 on average), although that number is also expected to increase in the coming years.

The data also reveals that Gmail is the leading email provider. At the beginning of last year Google announced that it had 1 billion active monthly users. This summer Gmail indicated that the figure had risen to 1.2 billion users, almost three times as many as five years ago (in 2012 there were 425 million).  This data demonstrates its dominance over its main competitor, Outlook, which has fewer users and has seen slower growth: at the start of the year it reached 400 million active users, while in 2011 Hotmail had 360 million.

The increasing use of smartphones to communicate, rather than computers, has not meant that people are using email any less. According to Gmail data, 75% of users say they check their email on their mobiles. After all, it is just as convenient to check mail using an app, with the added advantage that one can do so anywhere. What’s more, people are now sending emails in all kinds of situations: according to the aforementioned Adobe study, 69% check it while watching television, 59%, while in bed; and 43%, in the bathroom.

How are we using email?

In addition to being a tool that almost everyone has, we use email intensively: The Radicati Group estimates that 269 billion emails are sent daily. The figures from Internet Live Stats, a website that produces snapshots of Internet use in real time, are similar: according to this page, more than 75 billion emails have already been sent this year.

As we have said, e-mail is especially important in the corporate world. How often do we send messages using this tool? According to another study conducted by The Radicati Group, workers send and receive an average of 122 emails a day, which adds up to a considerable amount of time reading and writing messages.

Respondents to the study conducted by Adobe (1,000 white-collar employees) also see corporate mail continuing to have a place in the future: 57% of the participants believe that we will continue to use email in the same way in the next two years.

The study also shows that the youngest respondents (ages 25 to 34) check their mail more than others outside the office: on transport on their way to work, while walking, or even on vacation.

The survey also suggests that consumers like email, as 61% still prefer to receive offers by email rather than by other means, like social media. However, the fact that they prefer this medium does not mean that they want to be bombarded with messages: half of consumers say that the most irritating thing about corporate emails is that too many are sent.

Other studies have also reached similar conclusions, which is why companies must take note that quantity is not the same as quality. In addition, adapting email marketing campaigns to mobile phones must be a priority: 21% of consumers who check messages on their mobile devices find it frustrating that brands do not optimise their messages for use on smartphones.

As we have seen, email is alive and well, and will continue to be: it is still essential at companies, young people use it everywhere, and consumers prefer it over other alternatives.

Do you want to know how you are using email? Try Gmail Meter and receive a complete report on the use of your Gmail account, to improve your habits.


Obsessed with emails: this is how we are using email in 2017


A new message from a colleague at the office arrives in your inbox. The Subject line indicates “Urgent”, so you open it quickly, and respond in a few seconds, answering his question. You surely repeat this kind of action a few times over the course of your day, whether to chat with co-workers at the office, or with suppliers and clients. And this is not the only virtual mailbox that you check during the day. In your personal account you also receive promotional offers, confirmations of activity bookings, and data tracking your online purchases.

In recent years email has become an essential communication tool in both the personal and professional spheres. Now, how much time do we spend daily checking our emails? Do we send them at any time, or do we have a fixed schedule?

Adobe has just published a study on email use by 1,000 white-collar workers in the United States. One of the conclusions is that employees spend a great deal of time checking email: 5.4 hours on weekdays.


The preferred corporate communication channel

The data is surprising, but it actually seems that workers are improving their habits: those 5.4 hours of email use per day are 27% less time than that invested in 2016, according to the previous email usage study carried out by Adobe. Despite this decline, which shows that the use of email is in greater balance with other aspects of life, 73% of respondents acknowledge that they check their mail more often than they should.

However, there is one kind of account that is used more than another: while professional email is used 3.3 hours a day (20% less than the previous year), respondents say they use personal email for 2.1 hours (a 36% drop).  Not surprisingly, according to the study by Adobe, email is workers’ favourite tool at companies: 52% of the participants over age 25 in the study indicate that it is their main corporate communication channel.

Clicking on an email and reading through it is a more frequent action if the message is related to work matters. The participants in the study reported opening 82% of their corporate emails, but only 60% of their personal ones. Of those they open, they read 83% of those related to work, and 64% from family and friends.

The appearance of smartphones, tablets and smartwatches has meant, logically, that computers are no longer the only devices used to send and receive emails. In fact, the smartphone is the device most frequently used to check emails, especially among those under 35 years of age.

Despite this, the truth is that we prefer to answer work messages using a keyboard and looking at a larger screen: 62% of respondents in the Adobe study say that a desktop or laptop is their main device to view their email.


Young people, the most active group

In addition to using email several hours a day, many of these workers use it during working hours. Despite this, 37% of respondents say they check it while preparing to go to the office, or having breakfast, and 26% report out that they even check their inbox in bed, although that percentage is lower than the previous year. In this regard there are differences depending upon age: the youngest respondents are those who open the most emails while in bed.

Participants in the study ages 18-34 were more likely than those of other age groups to check email in all kinds of situations: watching TV, walking or even in the bathroom.  And the youngest users were those who are most on top of their email: 66% claim to leave their inbox totally clean; that is, answering, delete or filing away all emails, to prevent them from adding up.

Looking at ail while on holiday is also a common practice, although only 17% confess to checking it frequently while on vacation. 32% say they look at it occasionally, and almost a quarter say they forget about professional messages during their time off.

Besides using email very often for personal or professional issues, this tool is also the favourite of consumers for business communications. 61% of respondents prefer to receive offers by email rather than by other means (like SMS or via the social networks), and they prefer that the content of the emails be less promotional and more informative.

Do you want to analyse how you use your email?

The report on the use of email that Adobe has presented makes it clear that email continues to be an essential communication tool, especially at work: throughout the day, we check it on multiple occasions and spend a lot of time sending and receiving messages using it.

Moreover, users themselves believe that we will continue using email for professional purposes in the future: 57% of respondents believe that we will continue to check it as we have thus far for the next two years, and 20% believe that its use will increase.

We are experts in email technology and provide Gmail Meter users insights around their Gmail inbox. Want to know how you use your Gmail?  Try Gmail Meter now.